meridianrose
polyfanamourous reader and writer
ravenmorganleigh:

The Sunne in Splendour; the York Brothers, George, Edward and Richard. 
The White Queen.

ravenmorganleigh:

The Sunne in Splendour; the York Brothers, George, Edward and Richard. 

The White Queen.

1 hour ago with 13 notes — via mel1605, © ravenmorganleigh



Done watching DaVinci’s Demons…..loved battle of wits and wills between Leonardo and Count Riorio


As for Riario’s conflict with Da Vinci, Ritson speculates: “Right from the start, there are real parallels between the two of them. They are quite kindred spirits.

“They are, intelligence-wise, the only two who are a match. They both have horrid fathers. They are both illegitimate. They are both trying to carve their way into the world and searching for the truth. They are just coming from such polar opposite extremes. They constantly clash. You can imagine, a different world and a different context, they would probably get along really well.”

Reflecting on a scene that probably best explains this, he recalls: “One of my favourite episodes is episode two, which is my first meeting with Leonardo. When it begins, I just want an answer. I had written him off as a small pawn and, during the course of the scene, I tried blackmail, I tried bribery, I tried to befriend him and, by the end of it, I realise our fates are inextricably entwined and I absolutely need him. I want him to be my ally. I want to go into partnership with him. The idea of being snubbed sets us on a disastrous road.”

Comparing their relationship to the Chinese game Go, he says: “It is a great metaphor for how Leonardo and I work. You are not thinking one move ahead or two, you are thinking 10 moves ahead.

“In a world where people are acting very spontaneously, combusting and with violent actions, the two of us are looking at a much bigger game within these kind of political mutineers trying to outdo each other.”

Drawn together by their backgrounds, but torn apart by their objectives, Da Vinci’s conflict with Count Riario is but one of many in Da Vinci’s Demons, where the lines between fact and fiction blur at times.

(NICE)
Done watching DaVinci’s Demons…..loved battle of wits and wills between Leonardo and Count Riorio
As for Riario’s conflict with Da Vinci, Ritson speculates: “Right from the start, there are real parallels between the two of them. They are quite kindred spirits.
“They are, intelligence-wise, the only two who are a match. They both have horrid fathers. They are both illegitimate. They are both trying to carve their way into the world and searching for the truth. They are just coming from such polar opposite extremes. They constantly clash. You can imagine, a different world and a different context, they would probably get along really well.”
Reflecting on a scene that probably best explains this, he recalls: “One of my favourite episodes is episode two, which is my first meeting with Leonardo. When it begins, I just want an answer. I had written him off as a small pawn and, during the course of the scene, I tried blackmail, I tried bribery, I tried to befriend him and, by the end of it, I realise our fates are inextricably entwined and I absolutely need him. I want him to be my ally. I want to go into partnership with him. The idea of being snubbed sets us on a disastrous road.”
Comparing their relationship to the Chinese game Go, he says: “It is a great metaphor for how Leonardo and I work. You are not thinking one move ahead or two, you are thinking 10 moves ahead.
“In a world where people are acting very spontaneously, combusting and with violent actions, the two of us are looking at a much bigger game within these kind of political mutineers trying to outdo each other.”
Drawn together by their backgrounds, but torn apart by their objectives, Da Vinci’s conflict with Count Riario is but one of many in Da Vinci’s Demons, where the lines between fact and fiction blur at times.
(NICE)
2 hours ago with 11 notes — via i-dwell-in-possibilite


"You're always so perceptive about everyone but yourself."
4 hours ago with 911 notes — via haecceityofanelf, © thesecondprince


thefandomimagine:

Submitted by anonymous.

4 hours ago with 115 notes — via gwainesworld, © thefandomimagine


"Fan fiction is what literature might look like if it were reinvented from scratch after a nuclear apocalypse by a band of brilliant pop-culture junkies trapped in a sealed bunker. They don’t do it for money. That’s not what it’s about. The writers write it and put it up online just for the satisfaction. They’re fans, but they’re not silent, couchbound consumers of media. The culture talks to them, and they talk back to the culture in its own language."

The Boy Who Lived Forever | Time Magazine (via gypsy-sunday)

This is probably the best, non-judgmental description of fan fiction I’ve ever heard of in main stream media. 

(via raeseddon)

Beautiful. We talk back. 

That’s perfect. We are not passive in this.

(via anigrrrl2)

Bless.

(via don-gately)

4 hours ago with 115,115 notes — via mel1605


"We’re all born a Witch. We’re all born into magic. It’s taken from us as we grow up."
— Madeleine L’Engle (via unseelieangel)
4 hours ago with 19,697 notes — via stormwaterwitch, © merrymeet


maxkirin:

Writer’s Mood Ring Colors, by M. Kirin.

Want more writerly content? Follow maxkirin.tumblr.com!

4 hours ago with 17,654 notes — via maxkirin


laurajmoss:

Author problems.

laurajmoss:

Author problems.

6 hours ago with 547 notes — via laurajmoss


nubbsgalore:

during the autumn rutting season, red deer stag find themselves with elaborate bracken crowns from having rubbed their heads against the ground, which they do to strengthen their neck muscles so as to help them in battle with those competing for the affections of the does. photos by (click pic) mark smith, toby melville, luke millward and greg morgan in london’s richmond park. (see also: more autumn rut in richmond park)

10 hours ago with 12,735 notes — via stormwaterwitch, © nubbsgalore


curveyhunnie:

+Sleepy Hollow

curveyhunnie:

+Sleepy Hollow

19 hours ago with 15 notes — via curveyhunnie


forgedinink:

being an author is hard

forgedinink:

being an author is hard

19 hours ago with 320 notes — via forgedinink